Indiana, PA - Indiana County

Boyle says Asperger's diagnosis was a relief

by The Associated Press on December 09, 2013 10:40 AM

Susan Boyle says Asperger’s diagnosis was a relief

LONDON — Singer Susan Boyle says she has been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, a form of autism — and feels relief at finally having the right label for her condition.

Boyle told the Observer newspaper that she saw a specialist a year ago, who told her she had Asperger’s and an above-average IQ.

Boyle, 52, had learning difficulties as a child, which she was told were the result of brain damage from oxygen deprivation at birth. She struggled in school and was bullied by other children.

“I have always known that I have had an unfair label put upon me,” Boyle said in the interview, published Sunday.

“Now I have a clearer understanding of what’s wrong and I feel relieved and a bit more relaxed about myself.”

The church volunteer from a small Scottish town became a global sensation when she sang the “Les Miserables” number “I Dreamed a Dream” on TV contest “Britain’s Got Talent” in 2009.

The contrast between her shy manner and soaring voice won Boyle legions of fans. She has sold more than 14 million records around the world and recently released her fourth album, “Home for Christmas.” She makes her big-screen debut in holiday movie “The Christmas Candle.”

Boyle has occasionally struggled with the pressures of fame, and was treated for nervous exhaustion soon after her stint on “Britain’s Got Talent.”

The singer said she was glad she, and others, would now have a better understanding of the struggles she experiences.

“I would say I have relationship difficulties, communicative difficulties, which lead to a lot of frustration. If people were a bit more patient, that would help,” she told the newspaper.

“Asperger’s doesn’t define me. It’s a condition that I have to live with and work through, but I feel more relaxed about myself. People will have a much greater understanding of who I am and why I do the things I do.”

o o o

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Typewriters and a desk from the home of the original author of the Nancy Drew mystery books, along with a book detailing how the series was created, were auctioned in Ohio on Sunday.

The items were among a lifetime of keepsakes, including autographed posters and writing awards, belonging to Mildred Wirt Benson that sold at an auction in Toledo, where she was a newspaper reporter and columnist for nearly 60 years before her death a decade ago.

Benson wrote more than 130 books, including the 1940s Penny Parker mystery series, but she is best known for the Nancy Drew books that inspired and captivated generations of girls. She wrote 23 of the 30 original Nancy Drew stories using the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. Paid $125 per book, she never collected any royalties.

Benson died in 2002 at 96 and left her home and possessions to her only daughter, Peggy Wirt, who died in January.

A copy of “Rediscovering Nancy Drew” that details how the series was created and was inscribed for her daughter drew a gavel price of $2,150 Sunday.

A typewriter went for $825, and a desk for $525. A 10-book set by science-fiction writer Andre Norton, who had a personal relationship with Benson, was also auctioned. Nine of the 10 books were signed to Benson and the collection, along with some letters, had a gavel price of $3,200.

Auctioneer Jade Montrie, who handled the estate sale said a few hundred of Benson’s signed and canceled checks went for $900.

A typewriter that Benson used to write the Nancy Drew stories was donated to the Smithsonian Institution years ago. Her daughter left a collection of her mother’s books to the University of Iowa, which was Benson’s alma mater.

Next Article
Obamas head to South Africa for Mandela service
December 09, 2013 10:35 AM
Related Articles
Comments
Disclaimer: Copyright © 2014 Indiana Gazette. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.