Indiana, PA - Indiana County

Feds delay policy to allow small knives on planes

on April 23, 2013 10:40 AM

WASHINGTON — Airline passengers will have to leave their knives at home after all. And their bats and golf clubs.

A policy change scheduled to go into effect this week that would have allowed passengers to carry small knives, bats and other sports equipment onto airliners will be delayed, federal officials said Monday.

The delay is necessary to accommodate feedback from an advisory committee made up of aviation industry, consumer and law enforcement officials, the Transportation Security Administration said in a brief statement. The statement said the delay is temporary, but gave no indication how long it might be.

TSA Administrator John Pistole proposed the policy change last month, saying it would free up the agency to concentrate on protecting against greater threats. TSA screeners confiscate about 2,000 small folding knives from passengers every day.

The proposed policy would have permitted folding knives with blades that are 2.36 inches or less in length and are less than half an inch wide. The policy was aimed at allowing passengers to carry pen knives, corkscrews with small blades and other small knives.

N. Korea won’t ease up on nukes

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea is vowing to bolster its nuclear program in response to a U.S. State Department report accusing Pyongyang of human rights abuses.

Pyongyang’s Foreign Ministry today called the annual U.S. report proof of a hostile policy by Washington that’s aimed at toppling North Korea’s leadership.

The State Department last week cited defectors’ reports of extrajudicial killings, disappearances, arbitrary detention, arrests of political prisoners and torture.

Last month, Pyongyang also condemned a U.N. resolution approving a formal probe into suspected widespread rights violations.

Man’s slogan gets ‘preliminary no’

MONTPELIER, Vt. — A Vermont folk artist who built a T-shirt business around the phrase “eat more kale” says the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has given him a “preliminary no” in his effort to protect it after the Chick-fil-A restaurant chain complained.

Montpelier resident Bo Muller-Moore says he had expected Monday’s ruling to be more definitive. He says he has six months to respond to it.

Chick-fil-A has argued Muller-Moore’s T-shirt infringes on its trademarked “eat mor chikin” slogan.

The legal fight over “eat more kale” prompted Gov. Peter Shumlin to say in December 2011 the state would do all it could to help Muller-Moore against Chick-fil-A.

Atlanta-based Chick-fil-A hasn’t responded to an emailed request for comment on the “eat more kale” ruling.

Succession rule change nearly done

LONDON — Legislation that will end a centuries-old British rule that puts boys before girls in the succession to the throne has cleared the House of Lords, and now goes to Queen Elizabeth II for approval.

The change means that if Prince William and the former Kate Middleton have a girl first, she will become queen, and no younger brother will be able to jump the line and displace her.

The legislation also will permit an heir to the throne to marry a Catholic, though Catholics would still be barred from succeeding to the throne.

The royal couple’s first child, due in July, will be third in line to the throne after William and his father, Prince Charles.

Next Article
SOFTBALL: West Shamokin snaps losing streak with win
April 23, 2013 10:39 AM
Related Articles
Comments
Disclaimer: Copyright © 2014 Indiana Gazette. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.