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Man opens old safe, discovers gold coins


A Houston scrap collector hauled an old safe from a family's home, but when the vault was pried open he discovered it held a fortune in gold coins and silver dollars.


The man who opened the safe was David Molick, owner of Robbie's Key & Lock shop who told ABC News that the scrap collector asked him to break into the safe before it was turned into scrap about a month ago.


"He showed me a picture of this safe, and I saw that it was a high security one," Molick said. "It was real difficult to get into. It was pretty beat up. Looked like somebody had tried forcing their way into it since the front was beat up."


... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


 

Reflexology spa uses pythons for massage

 

...read the story on Yahoo! News

 

 


 

Satellite spots light show in the middle of the ocean

Those weird lights in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean — what are they? 


Are they an unstoppable force of electric underwater creatures swimming, slowly but steadily, toward the shore where they will flood our cities and force us all to watch "Finding Nemo" from now until the end of time? 


Fortunately, no (for now). The lights, which were spotted using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite on the Suomi NPPsatellite, are actually a large collection of fishermen.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Photographer captures haunting beauty in abandoned buildings

 

In one photograph, a tattered and filthy stuffed toy bear rests against a patterned Victorian backdrop. To its right is a blue-and-gold junk-filled jewelry box. To its left is a blackened bath brush with a white horse-shaped handle. Immediately in front lies a black-and-white photo of a car occupied by an unidentifiable woman with a blank face. On the photo’s edge is an orange pamphlet that says merely: “SACRED HEART BOARDING & DAY SCHOOL.”


In another photograph, one mannequin stares at another, its arms and legs ripped from a cracked and peeling torso that juts from the moss-covered ground. The second mannequin’s back is torn open to reveal wires and various parts. On the side, more mannequin detritus — a severed left arm here and a pale left leg there — covers the turf.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


UK town Stilton told it can't make stilton cheese

 

LONDON (AP) — They make fine cheese in the English village of Stilton. Just don't call it stilton.


British authorities said Wednesday that a local pub can't market its blue-veined cheese as stilton because that name is protected by European Union legislation.


The Bell Inn has been forced to sell its cheese as "Bells Blue" rather than stilton.

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


 

 

Richmond Times-Dispatch: 'Our choice for governor in 2013: none of the above'


Most endorsements of political candidates by newspapers are unmemorable. But when a newspaper refuses to endorse anyone, offering a scathing critique of the uninspiring choices instead, they can be.


That's the case in Virginia, where, for the first time in its history, the Richmond Times-Dispatch is not endorsing a candidate in the state's gubernatorial race.


"We cannot in good conscience endorse a candidate for governor," the newspaper said in a scathing editorial published Sunday. "The major-party candidates have earned the citizenry’s derision."

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


 

The Sistine Chapel has a problem -- and it's you

Michelangelo would not be pleased.

 

In the 530-plus years since he painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Vatican City, the Renaissance artist’s famous frescoes have been dealt a fair share of abuse. They’re dusty, they’re dirty, and they’re constantly being damaged by humidity, carbon dioxide and other pollutants.


Now, the head of the Vatican Museums, Antonio Paolucci, is warning that, if new air conditioning and air purifying systems that are being installed at the facility don’t significantly cut the pollution levels in the chapel, he will have no choice but to limit the number of tourists who visit the site. As it stands, more than five million people visit the Vatican every year, with more than 20,000 people a day stopping in the Sistine Chapel to view Michelangelo’s masterpiece. That number is up more than three-fold in the last 30 years.

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Oreos the next target in the War on Drugs

Those cookie crumbs clinging to the corners of little Timmy's mouth may be the telltale sign of a full-blown addiction -- especially if they're Oreo crumbs.

 

According to a study from students and professors at Connecticut College, lab rats find Oreo cookies to be as addictive as cocaine.

 

"Our reserach supports the theory that high-fat/high-sugar foods stimulate the brain in the same way that drugs do," said Joseph Schroeder, associate professor of Neuroscience at Connecticut College.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

18-foot-long sea creature found of Calif. coast


LOS ANGELES (AP) — A marine science instructor snorkeling off the Southern California coast spotted something out of a fantasy novel: the silvery carcass of an 18-foot-long, serpent-like oarfish.


Jasmine Santana of the Catalina Island Marine Institute needed more than 15 helpers to drag the giant sea creature with eyes the size of half dollars to shore Sunday.


Staffers at the institute are calling it the discovery of a lifetime.


... read the full story in today's Gazette

 

 


 

German man forgets bride in rest stop bathroom
 

Berlin (AFP) - A German man got his marriage off to a bad start after he drove for two hours down the motorway before realising he had forgotten his new bride at a petrol station.
 

The hapless husband took off from a highway stop while, unbeknown to him, his wife had gone to the toilet.
 

He only realised his mistake 200 kilometers (125 miles) down the road.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News 

 

 


 

Seal balances on great white shark's nose to escape jaws


A seal escaped the deadly jaws of an attacking great white shark in waters off South Africa by balancing on the shark’s nose before dropping back into the water andswimming away.


The incredible images above and below were captured by photographer David Jenkins of Dublin, Ireland, while on a great white shark tour boat off Cape Town. They show just how close the seal came to meeting its death, as the white shark clearly missed its target while attacking from below, as white sharks are known to do. The shark appears to have pushed the seal up into the air with its snout as the seal held on before making its escape.


...read the full story on Grind TV

 

 


 

Can fracking save the U.S. economy?

America’s government may be closed, but its energy sector is open for business. We are overtaking Russia as the world’s largest oil and gas producer.
 

Other countries with large reserves of natural resources have governments that are functional, yet their institutions and technology limit their production. Russia’s Kremlin is open, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah reigns supreme, and Chinese president Hu Jintao has his country firmly under control.
 

But America is producing more oil because private sector brains trump government bureaucracy — and much of America’s oil is on private lands.

... read the full story on Yahoo! Finance

 


 

Possible Leonardo Da Vinci artwork found in Swiss vault

A long sought-after artwork attributed to Leonardo da Vinci has been discovered among a private collection of 400 paintings locked in a Swiss Bank Vault.

The painting closely resembles a 1499 pencil sketch of Isabella d'Este, an Italian noblewoman, drawn by da Vinci in Mantua in Italy's Lombardy region, which is currently hanging in the Louvre Museum in Paris.

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


 

Lottery luck: Learn the recipe for winning the lottery

Last month, a man in Columbia, South Carolina hit the jackpot – literally – as the sole winner of a $400 million Powerball lottery drawing. The man had stopped at a gas station convenience store to buy hot dog buns, and when there weren’t any, he bought lottery tickets instead. To say he beat the odds is an understatement. 

...read the story and watch the video on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

Why it takes so long to get through airport security

 

Although the TSA is expanding its popular PreCheck fast lanes this fall, the agency is under pressure to speed up screening for even more fliers, so all aspects of the checkpoint experience are being scrutinized.
 

Here's one culprit that isn’t going away anytime soon: bin gridlock. Simply put, it’s too many bins piling up on the other side of the detector and not enough hands to move them off the conveyor belt. The TSA frequently has to call in extra help to keep bins moving during busy times. To get a closer look at this oft-overlooked side of security, I spent an afternoon earlier this summer at Dulles Airport outside Washington as a volunteer bin-pusher.

... read the full story on Yahoo! Travel

 

 


 

Did Venus give Earth the Moon? Wild new theory on lunar history

 

LONDON —The Earth's moon may be a present from Venus, which once had a moon and then lost it, a new theory suggests. Under the theory, Earth's gravity captured Venus' old moon, giving our planet its big natural satellite.

 

This idea contrasts to the thinking of the vast majority of moon researchers, who believe that the Earth's moon formed some 4.5 billion years ago when a planet-size body slammed into nascent Earth at high speed.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

NASA finds most crowded galaxy ever seen

Astronomers using NASA's flagship space telescopes have spotted what appears to be densest nearby galaxy ever seen, with stars packed so tightly that they are likely25 times closer to each other than the stars in our own Milky Way galaxy.

The super-crowded galaxy is called M60-UCD1 and is located about 54 million light-years away from Earth and the sun. It weighs a whopping 200 million times more than the sun, packing half of this mass within 80 light-years of its center, scientists said. Such crowded conditions make M60-UCD1 a type of ultra-compact dwarf galaxy.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

Can your I-Phone double as a cutting-edge earthquake detector?

When you grow up in California, "earthquake drills" are as common as fire drills. A teacher announces the presence of a quake. She may simulate, unconvincingly, the shaking of walls and windows and shelves. At that point, and as quickly as possible, you crawl under your desk, crouching into a ball and covering, as much as you can, your head and neck. The idea is to take up as little space as possible so that toppling ceilings won't topple onto you. The further idea is to use the rest of your body to protect the part of it that is at once the most delicate and the most important: your brain.

... read the full story on Mashable


 


 

Saudi cleric tells women that driving will damage their ovaries

 

October 26 is gearing up to be a landmark moment for women in Saudi Arabia, many of whom are expected to drive their own cars that day in order to protest the country's de facto ban on female drivers.


In anticipation of the protest, conservative cleric, Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Lohaidan told Saudi news website, sabq.org, that women should rethink this decision, and put "reason ahead of their hearts, emotions and passions."

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Boeing turns aging planes in to drones for Air Force target practice


What should the U.S. Air Force do with its aging fleet of aircraft? After all, the aircraft boneyard is already pretty crowded.


How about using them for target practice?

Boeing has been turning outdated planes into unmanned drones that the Air Force can use in targeting drills.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Rare gold coin sells for $2.75 million at auction


An extremely rare coin sold for $2.75 million during an auction on Monday, greatly exceeding expectations and making it one of the all-time biggest such sales in U.S. history. 

Mining.com reports that the “Coiled Hair Stella” coin was minted in 1880 featuring a profile image of Lady Liberty. The coin contains about six grams of pure gold and was never released into circulation. On the back of the coin an inscription reads, “ONE STELLA” and “400 CENTS.”

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News


 

Why lines for Disney are 'Magic'


At 36 years old, I finally went to Disney World. I'm a new citizen of the United States, so I thought I had better take part in a great American tradition. I was not disappointed. I have never seen anything like the pageantry, the eerie cleanliness of the place (comparable only to Singapore), the nonstop entertainment. But the most fascinating part for me was what is usually the worst part for everyone else — standing in line.

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

Boy author raises $400k for sick friend


When Dr. David Weinstein heard that a boy named Dylan Siegel was trying to raise money toward the rare liver disease he studies, he mostly just thought the boy was cute. Dylan was only 6-years-old, after all.


But Dylan's best friend had the rare disease, and he was determined to do something about it.


A year later,Dylan , who is now 7, has raised $400,000 by writing a book called "Chocolate Bar."

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


The story behind Christian Bale's Batman voice


Christian Bale may have officially exited the Batcave for good with his final performance as Bruce Wayne in last summer's "The Dark Knight Rises," but he has left behind a formidable legacy as the actor many feel made for the best-ever Batman. Bale brought a strong sense of physicality and authority to the role, as well as a much-debated distinctive vocal register ... a trait he conjured even before he was cast in the part.

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


10 most threatened state pension plans

 

The gap between the promises states have made for public employees’ retirement benefits and the money they have set aside is now a staggering $4.1 trillion, or $13,145 per capita, according to a recent research report. And combined, state public pension plans are just 39% funded, according to State Budget Solutions.


There’s much debate over the true size of the funding gap, centering on how public pension plan liabilities are calculated. In 2012, for instance, the Pew Center on the States said the funding gap was at least $1.38 trillion in fiscal year 2010. For its report, State Budget Solutions looked at each state’s total assets, total market-valued liability, overall funded ratio and unfunded liability. In addition, the research group looked at unfunded liabilities by state per capita and as a percentage of gross state product. 

 

... take a look at the 10 most threatened state public pension plans and read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

Saudi cleric tells women that driving will damage their ovaries

 

October 26 is gearing up to be a landmark moment for women in Saudi Arabia, many of whom are expected to drive their own cars that day in order to protest the country's de facto ban on female drivers.

In anticipation of the protest, conservative cleric, Sheikh Saleh bin Saad al-Lohaidan told Saudi news website, sabq.org, that women should rethink this decision, and put "reason ahead of their hearts, emotions and passions."

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Boeing turns aging planes in to drones for Air Force target practice


What should the U.S. Air Force do with its aging fleet of aircraft? After all, the aircraft boneyard is already pretty crowded.


How about using them for target practice?


Boeing has been turning outdated planes into unmanned drones that the Air Force can use in targeting drills.

...read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

Rare gold coin sells for $2.75 million at auction


An extremely rare coin sold for $2.75 million during an auction on Monday, greatly exceeding expectations and making it one of the all-time biggest such sales in U.S. history. 

Mining.com reports that the “Coiled Hair Stella” coin was minted in 1880 featuring a profile image of Lady Liberty. The coin contains about six grams of pure gold and was never released into circulation. On the back of the coin an inscription reads, “ONE STELLA” and “400 CENTS.”

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News


 

Why lines for Disney are 'Magic'


At 36 years old, I finally went to Disney World. I'm a new citizen of the United States, so I thought I had better take part in a great American tradition. I was not disappointed. I have never seen anything like the pageantry, the eerie cleanliness of the place (comparable only to Singapore), the nonstop entertainment. But the most fascinating part for me was what is usually the worst part for everyone else — standing in line.

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


 

 

Boy author raises $400k for sick friend


When Dr. David Weinstein heard that a boy named Dylan Siegel was trying to raise money toward the rare liver disease he studies, he mostly just thought the boy was cute. Dylan was only 6-years-old, after all.


But Dylan's best friend had the rare disease, and he was determined to do something about it.


A year later,Dylan , who is now 7, has raised $400,000 by writing a book called "Chocolate Bar."

 

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 

 


The story behind Christian Bale's Batman voice


Christian Bale may have officially exited the Batcave for good with his final performance as Bruce Wayne in last summer's "The Dark Knight Rises," but he has left behind a formidable legacy as the actor many feel made for the best-ever Batman. Bale brought a strong sense of physicality and authority to the role, as well as a much-debated distinctive vocal register ... a trait he conjured even before he was cast in the part.

... read the full story on Yahoo! News

 


10 most threatened state pension plans

 

The gap between the promises states have made for public employees’ retirement benefits and the money they have set aside is now a staggering $4.1 trillion, or $13,145 per capita, according to a recent research report. And combined, state public pension plans are just 39% funded, according to State Budget Solutions.

There’s much debate over the true size of the funding gap, centering on how public pension plan liabilities are calculated. In 2012, for instance, the Pew Center on the States said the funding gap was at least $1.38 trillion in fiscal year 2010. For its report, State Budget Solutions looked at each state’s total assets, total market-valued liability, overall funded ratio and unfunded liability. In addition, the research group looked at unfunded liabilities by state per capita and as a percentage of gross state product. 

 

... take a look at the 10 most threatened state public pension plans and read the full story on Yahoo! News

 



 

Firefighters uncover mysterious plane submerged in NC lake 


Firefighters on a training exercise in a North Carolina lake uncovered what appeared to be a small plane submerged nearly 100 feet below the water's surface.

 


 

Eight-foot crocodile found under bed

A man in Zimbabwe got the surprise of his life when he discovered an eight-foot crocodile lying under his bed.

 


Documentary recounts story of man who was seconds away from killing JFK years before his assassination

 

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, was one of the century's darkest moments. Far less documented is the earlier attempt on his life, on December 11, 1960 — just weeks after Kennedy was elected president, according to a new documentary from the Smithsonian Channel.

 


 

Barn own flies off, takes a nap in church rafters with couple's wedding rings

 

A UK bride and groom were left awkwardly staring upward at their wedding when a pesky barn owl flew off with their rings and took a nap in the church rafters.

 



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