Crack Holiday Cooking with Eggs

(Family Features) The focus for home chefs hosting during the holidays is often centered around the big feast, but if you’re welcoming guests for an extended period or just looking to fuel your immediate family for the festivities, eggs are the perfect partner for cracking holiday cooking and entertaining.

Breakfasts, brunches, lunches, snacks, desserts and more offer delicious opportunities to enjoy flavorful foods with those you love. While preparing a variety of meals may feel overwhelming, you can simplify the season by leaning on eggs to elevate all types of recipes.

This holiday season, home cooks seeking hacks to crack the code of creating memorable, enjoyable, affordable holiday recipes can turn to a versatile ingredient like eggs. An important ingredient of globally influenced dishes honoring different cultures and religions around the globe, eggs can help you tap into celebrations regardless of your own traditions. Plus, eggs make entertaining easy and cost-effective in favorite dishes prepared year after year or when getting creative in the kitchen with something new.

Whether you’re cooking for a crowd or simply spending precious moments with your nearest and dearest, there’s no need to compromise easy, affordable indulgence. Add a touch of delicious decadence to brunch with this Sunchokes and Potato Quiche by New York Times best-selling cookbook author and founder of @PreppyKitchen, John Kanell, a flavor-forward way to bring everyone together and make entertaining eggstra special. You can have it all with a homemade crust and veggie-loaded filling by starting with the simple crack of an egg.

Transform your holiday celebrations and make this year one to remember by sharing your creations using #CracktheHolidayswithEggs, and find more recipe inspiration at

IncredibleEgg.org

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Sunchokes and Potato Quiche

Recipe courtesy of John Kanell (@PreppyKitchen) on behalf of the American Egg Board

Prep time: 20 minutes

Cook time: 55 minutes

Servings: 10

Crust:

  • 1 lemon, zest and juice only
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/3 cups flour
  • 9 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Quiche:

  • 1/3 cup Yukon gold potatoes, cut into1/2-inch cubes
  • 3/4 cup sunchokes, sliced 1/2-inch thick
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 cups Swiss chard, chopped with stock removed

Custard:

  • 6 eggs
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan
  • 1/2 cup grated gouda
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped
  1. To make crust: In small bowl, whisk lemon juice with egg.
  2. In large bowl, mix flour, butter and salt. Mix using hands. Drizzle in lemon mixture. Add lemon zest.
  3. Using fingers, knead dough to break down butter. Cover dough with plastic wrap and roll into disc while at room temperature then refrigerate until firm.
  4. To make quiche filling: Preheat oven to 425 F.
  5. Toss potatoes and sunchokes with olive oil, salt and pepper then spread out on baking sheet.
  6. Bake 15-20 minutes, or until fork tender, tossing pieces halfway through.
  7. Add onion to well-buttered pan and cook over medium heat about 15 minutes, stirring frequently, until caramel colored. Add Swiss chard and continue cooking until wilted, stirring occasionally. Set aside to cool.
  8. Roll out dough on pastry mat or well-floured surface. Prick with fork. Carefully transfer dough to quiche pan, fold edges under and crimp then transfer to freezer.
  9. To make custard: Reduce oven temperature to 375 F.
  10. In large bowl, whisk eggs, cheeses, heavy cream, parsley and thyme.
  11. Add caramelized onions and vegetables then mix. Add mixture to crust.
  12. Tent with foil and bake about 20 minutes.
  13. Reduce oven temperature to 350 F and bake about 40 minutes.
  14. For food safety, casseroles containing eggs should always be cooked at a minimum of 160 F.

Notes: Bake times depend on size of quiche. Deeper quiches may require additional bake time. As quiche cools, filling continues to set; it may wobble when removed from oven.

 

Photo courtesy of Getty Images (mother and daughter baking)